Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Random Pictures from the Road (and otherwise)

As a follow follow up to Chastity's post, I thought a few random pictures from the road would be entertaining. I have been part of group 5 and as such responsible for the part of the line that spans from Hahira in the south to just north of Adel.

South-central part of the seismic line. The yellow line is team 5's section. 
We have been in a relatively rural part of Georgia and as a result have not encountered many locals save a few who have stopped to ask if we are ok. However, we have seen quite a few interesting things that are quite out of the ordinary (to me at least).

Friendly Muscovy duck.
Rocks in a stream bed with associated pink spongy material (?)

Spanish moss.
Linguoid (current) ripples on a washed out road.
 We have also seen quite a few old abandoned farm houses in various stages of aging...

At least 10-15 dogs were standing guard at this house, including about 8 puppies.

Caroline making some new friends.

All said we have dug 122 holes in team 5's stretch. We have also helped deploy instruments in other sections as well and while doing so have seen others hard at work.

Meghan and Nate getting it done!
Along the way the cars have taken quite a beating and have actually held up pretty well. Although there have been a few instances where people got stuck, I think that the people with the toughest job will be the guys that have to detail the cars upon their return...

A more appropriate vehicle (?)
And lastly here's a couple more random pictures that I thought were interesting.

The large disparity in fuel grade gas prices.

A ~perfectly leveled geophone (it's harder than you'd think).
Hopefully this random selection of pictures was entertaining. Up next we will post about last night's "shots." In the meantime, I can say that they were all successful with varying degrees of excitement. The most important thing is that all of our hard work is being realized as the instruments are recording refractions from buried geology that will help us unravel some of the mystery that surrounds events that happened in this area long ago.

James Gibson, LDEO