Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Long lines and lots of instruments

If you want to image the Earth’s crust and upper mantle with seismic data, you need to record the arrival of seismic waves that have propagated down to, in our case, depths of up to ~30 km.  These deep-diving phases travel quickly through the denser, higher velocity rocks of the lower crust and upper mantle, and they arrive back at the surface ahead of shallower phases at long source-receiver offsets (see video below).  


video


To record these lower-crustal and upper-mantle phases as “first arrivals”, where they are not obscured by the arrival of energy from shallow paths, we use long lines.  Long lines mean lots of receivers and lots of driving to deploy and recover these instruments.  We could have used lots of sources instead, but the blasts we used to get seismic energy into the lower crust and upper mantle in this experiment take a lot of time and money to setup.  Receivers are much cheaper, so we used a lot of them.  (For similar wide-angle/long-offset work at sea, airgun sources are cheaper than putting seismometers on the seafloor, so we use many shots and a smaller number of receivers out there.)


This time-lapse video shows Team 13 of 14 recovering 89 of the 1200 total short-period seismograph stations from where our line crossed Fort Benning, near the northwestern end of the line.



Nathan Miller, LDEO


Deploy in the rain, recover in the sunshine…



Weather map during deployment.
When the time came to install our 1200 small seismographs across Georgia at the flagged positions, the rains came….   A lot of rain.  During our first deployment day, we received 1-2 inches of rain, and another wave of rain clouds came through on Day 2 (check out map). Roads that used to be easily passable became mudholes or were flooded with water. All-wheel-drive vehicles and drill rigs alike got stuck, and a few station locations could only be reached on foot. Our hard-working field crew labored in the rain digging holes and deploying seismometers.  Vehicles, equipment and people were covered in the famous Georgia red clay (and other muds and sands of Georgia and northernmost Florida). Adding insult to injury, problems with the programming of some of the instruments meant that we actually had to pick up and redeploy many of them. It was a mudbath.  Nonetheless, our field crew managed to deploy 1200 seismometers across Georgia by Tuesday at sundown. It was an impressive show of endurance, and an inspiring display of positivity given the number of people that were still smiling and upbeat at the end of it all. 
A couple of days later, after our seismic shots, it was already time to pick up the instruments, and the weather changed completely.  The sun shined on SW Georgia, and we picked up almost every last seismometer in just one day under blue skies….  
Donna Shillington, LDEO

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Random Pictures from the Road (and otherwise)

As a follow follow up to Chastity's post, I thought a few random pictures from the road would be entertaining. I have been part of group 5 and as such responsible for the part of the line that spans from Hahira in the south to just north of Adel.

 
South-central part of the seismic line. The yellow line is team 5's section. 
We have been in a relatively rural part of Georgia and as a result have not encountered many locals save a few who have stopped to ask if we are ok. However, we have seen quite a few interesting things that are quite out of the ordinary (to me at least).

Friendly Muscovy duck.
Rocks in a stream bed with associated pink spongy material (?)

Spanish moss.
Linguoid (current) ripples on a washed out road.
 We have also seen quite a few old abandoned farm houses in various stages of aging...



At least 10-15 dogs were standing guard at this house, including about 8 puppies.

Caroline making some new friends.

All said we have dug 122 holes in team 5's stretch. We have also helped deploy instruments in other sections as well and while doing so have seen others hard at work.

Meghan and Nate getting it done!
Along the way the cars have taken quite a beating and have actually held up pretty well. Although there have been a few instances where people got stuck, I think that the people with the toughest job will be the guys that have to detail the cars upon their return...



A more appropriate vehicle (?)
And lastly here's a couple more random pictures that I thought were interesting.

The large disparity in fuel grade gas prices.

A ~perfectly leveled geophone (it's harder than you'd think).
Hopefully this random selection of pictures was entertaining. Up next we will post about last night's "shots." In the meantime, I can say that they were all successful with varying degrees of excitement. The most important thing is that all of our hard work is being realized as the instruments are recording refractions from buried geology that will help us unravel some of the mystery that surrounds events that happened in this area long ago.

James Gibson, LDEO

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Rain, geophones, and animals … Oh my!


Our first day of deployment did not go as planned.  Inclement weather slightly dampened our spirits, but it’s amazing how omni-dry pants and waterproof boots can combat that!  Our second day was still wet, but the rain was not nearly as torrential.  The good news was that the heavy rain had softened many of the sites so it was not as difficult to dig.  In fact, many of the deployment teams were able to bury over half of their geophones in that second day.

Curious cows....
Deployment, like surveying, has its own interesting encounters - from curious neighbors to farm animals and reptiles.  Curious neighbors have both shared their enthusiasm for the project as well as offered their services due to our flashing hazard lights when we pulled over to deploy.  Cows also seem to be very interested in our activities as many times they have curiously walked over and stared intently in our direction while we work, all the while “mooing” as if alarming the others.   We also have seen many calves and kids suckling, which yielded many “awwwws.”  The scariest encounter is most likely that of snakes.  They are sneaky, as they hide in the brush!

Unwelcome visitor....

Deployment is tough work.  By the end of the day, we are tired from digging and navigating on soggy and muddy dirt roads.  After returning back to home base (the gym), we get together for dinner and enjoy a few laughs and tears (happy ones, of course!).   It is this camaraderie that makes the SUGAR project all the more better because of the camaraderie. 

Chastity Aiken
Georgia Institute of Technology

Saturday, March 15, 2014

Flags, Flags, and More Flags - Locating the sites for 1200 instruments

Many of the SUGAR field team arrived in Americus, GA on Wednesday to start helping with the massive charge of deploying 1200 seismic instruments along the SUGAR seismic line.  The seismic line spans 200 miles from northwest Georgia to just past the Georgia-Florida border; a 4+ hour car drive from end to end!  Everyone gathered early Thursday morning on the idyllic Georgia Southwestern State campus to meet with the chief scientists and learn about the proper techniques for identifying installation sites for the seismographs (just the first step in installing the instruments).  With neon orange safety jackets, numerous maps, GPS devices, packets of official permitting documents, and heads full of safety precautions the field team split into seven two-person pairs each equipped with their own squeaky clean rental car (though they didn’t stay clean for very long!).  
The fleet of SUGAR rental cars looking clean and shiny before being driven
into the field where they undoubtedly got a little mud on their tires.
Each pair of field assistants was given a segment of the seismic line to drive and flag locations for instrument installation deemed safe both from the seismograph (i.e. dry, firm soil) and the install team (i.e. a safe distance from the road).  Given the shear distance of the seismic line, teams found themselves amid diverse backdrops from rolling farmland with overly friendly cows to buzzing residential neighborhoods to sandy stretches flanked by towering groves of Ponderosa Pine trees. 
Antonio placing a flag and using a GPS device to note the location where a
seismograph will be installed amid the sandy surroundings of a Ponderosa Pine farm.
Every team was able to flag all their sites within just two days leaving us the luxury of a sunny Saturday morning free for exploring more of our beautiful Georgia surroundings.  Next up is the actual task of installing the 1200 seismographs which will involve twice the people, six more (temporarily clean) vehicles, and of course countless exciting adventures from the field.  Happy (almost) St. Patrick’s Day from Americus!
A picturesque county road near Jasper, FL along which instruments will be deployed.
-- Natalie Accardo, LDEO





Friday, March 14, 2014

A day with the seismic source team in photos

The source of sound waves for the SUGAR experiment will be a series of controlled blasts along the profile.  For each of these, we drill a 60-100 ft deep hole, place emulsion explosives with boosters and caps at the base of the hole, and fill in the rest of the hole with dirt and gravel.  Each seismic source location requires a substantial amount of work by drillers and the UTEP seismic source team.  Below, Adrian Gutierrez shows a day in the life of the source team with pictures (Donna Shillington, 13 March 2014)

Adrian Gutierrez, 13 March 14
7:30 am: Leave Georgia Southwestern State University, where we are staying, and head to the site
8:20 am: Arrive at site
8:30 am: Start drilling and take geological samples every 5 ft.

9:00 am: Dyno Nobel truck arrives; load emulsion into cut PVC pipe sections that serve as a holders for emulsion.
9:30 am: Surprise visit from other scientists on the project
9.50 am: Setting up the booster in the emulsion.
11.20 am: Loading the explosives into the drill hole
12.00 pm: Drill crew starts removing their equipment
12.45 pm: Tagging the charges and plugging the hole
3.15 pm: Move onto the next drill site.
Nighttime: Finally back to the dorm.



Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Arrival of the seismic equipment!

Boxes with seismographs and other equipment
During this project, we will deploy 1200 small seismographs along a 200-mile-long (300-km-long) profile across Georgia.  All of these seismographs were shipped to Georgia from Socorro, New Mexico. This is the headquarters of the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Program for Array Seismic Studies of the Continental Lithosphere (PASSCAL), a facility that provides seismic instrumentation to US researchers.  It takes a lot of boxes to hold all 1200 seismographs and the associated equipment and tools.  There are 15 seismographs per box, so that's 80 boxes alone without counting boxes for geophones, etc. 

Fortunately, we have a lot of space! Our field headquarters is located in a historic gym on the campus of Georgia Southwestern State University in Americus, GA.  Faculty and staff at GSW have been extraordinarily generous with their time and expertise. They are allowing us to use the Florrie Chappel gym as our base of operations, and they have helped us enormously with Georgia geology and logistics coordination, handling our huge shipment of equipment and supplies, housing on the campus (many of us are staying in one of the dorms!), setting up the gym with internet access, power, and tables, and much, much more. Today, they moved all of the boxes with our seismic equipment from the shipping warehouse to our field headquarters in the gym. I can sense that all of our seismic instruments are itching to be deployed....
Pallets waiting outside the Florrie Chappell gym
Donna Shillington
11 March 2014